Mozart

Mozart

Hello hello hello … it’s Mozart day ! Don Giovanni, String Quintetts, Requiem, Rondo alla turca, Piano Sonata in F Major, Clarinet Concerto in A Major, … who cares … there is no favorite … he is just a genius … and that’s because 99% of his work is simply sublime . Below is the top of the wiki page … Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeus ˈmoːtsaʁt], English see fn.;[1] 27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart,[2] was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He chose to stay in the capital, where he achieved fame but little financial security. During his final years in Vienna, he composed many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas, and portions of the Requiem, which was largely unfinished at the time of his death. The circumstances of his early death have been much mythologized. He was survived by his wife Constanze and two sons. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, andchoral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydnwrote that “posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years.”[3] >> Go To Source...
Giacomo Puccini

Giacomo Puccini

Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924), generally known as Giacomo Puccini, was an Italian composer whose operas are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire.[n 1] Puccini has been called “the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi”.[1] While his early work was rooted in traditional late-19th-century romantic Italian opera, he successfully developed his work in the ‘realistic’ verismo style, of which he became one of the leading exponents. >> Go to Source...
Why 12 notes to the Octave?

Why 12 notes to the Octave?

Here is the beginning of an exhausting explanation … The Greeks realized that sounds which have frequencies in rational proportion are perceived as harmonius. For example, a doubling of frequency gives an octave. A tripling of frequency gives a perfect fifth one octave higher. They didn’t know this in terms of frequencies, but in terms of lengths of vibrating strings. Pythagoras, who experimented with a monochord, noticed that subdividing a vibrating string into rational proportions produces consonant sounds. This translates into frequencies when you know that the fundamental frequency of the string is inversely proportional to its length, and that its other frequencies are just whole number multiples of the fundamental. (actually, the notion of consonance is more complicated than rationality- see, for example, this fascinating article ). First, we should examine what ratios are “meant” to exist in the western scale. The prominence of the major triad in western music reflects the Greek discoveries mentioned above. Starting with the note C as a fundamental, we get the major triad from the 3rd and 5th overtones, dropping down one and two octaves respectively, obtaining ratios of 3/2 (G:C) and 5/4 (E:C) respectively. Two other prominent features in western music include the V I cadence, and the I,IV,V triads. Both reflect the importance of the 3/2 ratio, with the IV further taking into account the reciprocal of 3/2, namely 2/3 aka 4/3. Musically, the reciprocal ratio corresponds to going down rather than up. While 3/2 corresponds to going up a fifth, 2/3 corresponds to going down a fifth, and 4/3 corresponds to going down a fifth and up an octave....
The DIY orchestra of the future

The DIY orchestra of the future

Absolutely fantastic … music always goes and very encouraging to see ideas to bring it back to the people … Ge Wang makes computer music, but it isn’t all about coded bleeps and blips. With the Stanford Laptop Orchestra, he creates new instruments out of unexpected materials—like an Ikea bowl—that allow musicians to play music that’s both beautiful and expressive. Both a musician and a computer scientist, Ge Wang turns ordinary MacBooks and iPhones into complex...
Miles lives

Miles lives

Oh my oh … he is the man … you might say was , but no – is and always will be . Strange but I always listen to his music and think of Mozart. Well, could ramamble for ages here but better behave now. As usual below is a quick link to the inevitable wiki site . Just one hint, in case you are scared of jazz or believe it’s not for you – try Kind of Blue ! Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, trumpeter, bandleader, and composer. Widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century,[3] Miles Davis was, together with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebop, cool jazz, hard bop, modal jazz, and jazz fusion. >> Go to Source...