NoSQL

Now that we just get used to SQL, lets go to NoSQL. Have a look at this prominent introduction … good for perspective . Introduction to NoSQL by Martin Fowler So, nothing lost...

Prime Numbers – Visual Patterns ?

Will these pictures give you some idea of what their secret is ? Maybe there is no secret ! The Ulam spiral is a way of visualizing the distribution of prime numbers (black dots in the image and blue in the movie below). This pattern is one the great unsolved mysteries in mathematics and has important consequences in Cryptography. You create the pattern on an “infinite” grid of squares where you start somewhere and label the square with 1 then move one to the right and label the square 2 then move one up and label it 3 and keep going in a spiral fashion. This is your base grid. Now color or highlight the prime numbers in that grid plane and you get the picture if you use black … Most interesting is the appearance of diagonal straights and other patterns in this … Watch...

Samuel Barber

Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of orchestral, opera, choral, and piano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that “Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim.”[1] His Adagio for Strings (1936) has earned a permanent place in the concert repertory of orchestras. He was twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize for music, for his opera Vanessa (1956–57) and his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1962). Also widely performed is his Knoxville: Summer of 1915 (1947), a work for soprano and orchestra, which sets a prose text by James Agee. Unusual among contemporary composers, nearly all of his compositions have been recorded. >> Go to Source...

The Taming of The Finest Bubbles

An initial burst of effervescence occurs when the Champagne contacts the dry glass on pouring. These bubbles form on imperfections in the glass that facilitate nucleation or, to a lesser extent, on cellulose fibres left over from the wiping/drying process as shown with a high-speed video camera. However, after the initial rush, these naturally occurring imperfections are typically too small to consistently act as nucleation points as the surface tension of the liquid smooths out these minute irregularities. The nucleation sites that act as a source for the ongoing effervescence are not natural imperfections in the glass, but actually occur where the glass has been etched by the manufacturer or the customer. This etching is typically done with acid, a laser, or a glass etching tool from a craft shop to provide nucleation sites for continuous bubble formation (note that not all glasses are etched in this way). In 1662 this method was developed in England, as records from the Royal Society show. Dom Pérignon was originally charged by his superiors at the Abbey of Hautvillers to get rid of the bubbles since the pressure in the bottles caused many of them to burst in the cellar. As sparkling wine production increased in the early 18th century, cellar workers had to wear a heavy iron mask to prevent injury from spontaneously bursting bottles. The disturbance caused by one bottle exploding could cause a chain reaction, with it being routine for cellars to lose 20–90% of their bottles this way. The mysterious circumstance surrounding the then unknown process of fermentation and carbonic gas caused some critics to call the sparkling...

Eiffel

Not the tower but the programming language. I am surprised how few people know about it and how even fewer dare to use it. But then we love C# and that’s the fashion and it is funky and sexy and does it all … ??? However, have a look and think … Eiffel is an ISO-standardized, object-oriented programming language designed by Bertrand Meyer (an object-orientation proponent and author of Object-Oriented Software Construction) and Eiffel Software. The design of the language is closely connected with the Eiffel programming method. Both are based on a set of principles, including design by contract, command-query separation, the uniform-access principle, the single-choice principle, the open-closed principle, and option-operand separation. Many concepts initially introduced by Eiffel later found their way into Java, C#, and other languages. New language design ideas, particularly through the Ecma/ISO standardization process, continue to be incorporated into the Eiffel language. >> Go to Source...

Architecture at home in its community

When TED Fellow Xavier Vilalta was commissioned to create a multistory shopping mall in Addis Ababa, he panicked. Other centers represented everything he hated about contemporary architecture: wasteful, glass towers requiring tons of energy whose design had absolutely nothing to do with Africa. In this charming talk, Vilalta shows how he champions an alternative approach: to harness nature, reference design tradition and create beautiful, modern, iconic buildings fit for a community. Barcelona-based architect Xavier Vilalta works in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. He adopts and updates traditional design principles to construct modern buildings that truly suit their environment. >> Play...

Steven Paul “Steve” Jobs

Steven Paul “Steve” Jobs (February 24, 1955 – October 5, 2011) was an American entrepreneur,[7] marketer,[8] and inventor,[9] who was the co-founder (along with Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne), chairman, and CEO of Apple Inc. Through Apple, he is widely recognized as a charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution[10][11] and for his influential career in the computer and consumer electronics fields, transforming “one industry after another, from computers and smartphones to music and movies”.[12] Jobs also co-founded and served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios; he became a member of the board of directors of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, when Disney acquired Pixar. Jobs was among the first to see the commercial potential of Xerox PARC’s mouse-driven graphical user interface, which led to the creation of the Apple Lisa and, one year later, the Macintosh. He also played a role in introducing the LaserWriter, one of the first widely available laser printers, to the market.[13] After a power struggle with the board of directors in 1985, Jobs left Apple and founded NeXT, a computer platform development company specializing in the higher-education and business markets. In 1986, he acquired the computer graphics division of Lucasfilm, which was spun off as Pixar.[14] He was credited in Toy Story (1995) as an executive producer. He served as CEO and majority shareholder until Disney’s purchase of Pixar in 2006.[15] In 1996, after Apple had failed to deliver its operating system, Copland, Gil Amelio turned to NeXT Computer, and the NeXTSTEP platform became the foundation for the Mac OS X.[16] Jobs returned to Apple as an advisor, and took control...

How An Arcane Coding Method From 1970s Banking Software Could Save The Sanity Of Web Developers Everywhere

Forty years ago, a Canadian bank pioneered a brand new computer system that allowed non-programmers to help write code. The paradigm was so disruptive that it was ignored by computer scientists for decades. But as web apps get increasingly complex, and web devs become increasingly stressed out, “flow-based programming” may be raging back to life. >> Go to...

Douglas Hofstadter

Douglas Richard Hofstadter (February 15, 1945 – …) is an American professor of cognitive science whose research focuses on the sense of “I”,[2][3] consciousness, analogy-making, artistic creation, literary translation, and discovery in mathematics and physics. He is best known for his book Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, first published in 1979. It won both the Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction[4][5] and a National Book Award (at that time called The American Book Award) for Science.[6][a] His 2007 book I Am a Strange Loop won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Science and Technology.[7][8][9] … >> Go to Source...

Paul Jackson Pollock

Paul Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956), known as Jackson Pollock, was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for his unique style of drip painting. During his lifetime, Pollock enjoyed considerable fame and notoriety, a major artist of his generation. Regarded as reclusive, he had a volatile personality, and struggled with alcoholism for most of his life. In 1945, he married the artist Lee Krasner, who became an important influence on his career and on his legacy.[1] Pollock died at the age of 44 in an alcohol-related, single-car accident; he was driving. In December 1956, several months after his death, Pollock was given a memorial retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City. A larger, more comprehensive exhibition of his work was held there in 1967. In 1998 and 1999, his work was honored with large-scale retrospective exhibitions at MoMA and at The Tate in London.[2][3] In 2000, Pollock was the subject of the film Pollock, directed by and starring Ed Harris, which won an Academy Award. >> Go to Source...

Mozart

Hello hello hello … it’s Mozart day ! Don Giovanni, String Quintetts, Requiem, Rondo alla turca, Piano Sonata in F Major, Clarinet Concerto in A Major, … who cares … there is no favorite … he is just a genius … and that’s because 99% of his work is simply sublime . Below is the top of the wiki page … Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeus ˈmoːtsaʁt], English see fn.;[1] 27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), baptised as Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart,[2] was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He chose to stay in the capital, where he achieved fame but little financial security. During his final years in Vienna, he composed many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas, and portions of the Requiem, which was largely unfinished at the time of his death. The circumstances of his early death have been much mythologized. He was survived by his wife Constanze and two sons. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, andchoral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydnwrote that “posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years.”[3] >> Go To Source...

Zooming the Zone

We all know that the best way to get something done is to write down a list of what to do. Well, here for you need of course some idea of what it is you are doing and that usually implies a little of analysing or broadly spoken “cutting into pieces”. In doing so it is sometimes necessary to keep cutting the things again and again until they are small enough to be digested. Parallels to actual eating food? Yes, naturally we wouldn’t eat the whole salmon in one go – even if it smells delicious and we can’t wait to have it down our throats. We would separate it into smaller pieces and then start pleasing our taste buds … but what happens when our cutting results in pieces which have the same behavior or structure, lets say pattern as one of the previously found? Deadlock? Frustration? Maybe initially some excitement of recognizing something and some pleasure of presumptuous “Oh, I know that!”. but that will die away quickly when we realize that we actually didn’t understand anything. Point of depression is reached quickly. However, no need to be disappointed. Just change the zoom from in to out and look at it from the whole. Embrace the thing. Let it simmer in your brain and find its own way. Remember the fractals and Mandelbrot set pictures? How certain pattern popped up again and again and the recursiveness of the whole thing became more and more obvious to that extent that we actually do understand now what this is about. At least some of us. Almost not necessary as...

Trees and Other Hierarchies in MySQL

Great chapter from the unmissable book by Peter Brawley and Arthur Fuller … http://www.artfulsoftware.com/ … Thank you boys! Most non-trivial data is hierarchical. Customers have orders, which have line items, which refer to products, which have prices. Population samples have subjects, who take tests, which give results, which have sub-results and norms. Web sites have pages, which have links, which collect hits, which distribute across dates and times. With such data, we know the depth of the hierarchy before we sit down to write a query. The depth of the hierarchy of tables fixes the number of JOINs we need to write. But if our data describes a family tree, or a browsing history, or a bill of materials, hierarchical depth depends on the data. We no longer know how many JOINs it will take to walk the tree. We need a different data model. That model is the graph (Fig 1), which is a set of nodes (vertices) and the edges (lines or arcs) that connect them. This chapter is about how to model and query graphs in a MySQL database. Graph theory is a branch of topology. It is the study of geometric relations which aren’t changed by stretching and compression—rubber sheet geometry, some call it. Graph theory is ideal for modelling hierarchies—like family trees, browsing histories, search trees and bills of materials—whose shape and size we can’t know in advance. >> Go to Source...

Data Transformation and Linear Algebra

The problem of data transformation is solved in numerous ways with different levels of smartness and in different flavors. ETL (extract – transform – load) processes is a buzz word strongly related to this topic. Basically the requirement is to get a defined set of data entities, that would be data structures like records from tables in schemas from one presentation into another. That can be just a space time transformation (trivial as it maintains the structure – shape) or structural transformation which is shape changing. Based on some concepts of linear algebra where a fully understood algorithm has been defined over the last centuries, mostly the actual work done on different presentations of so called vectors ( which are well defined sets of data within a presentation (multi dimensional space) ). So something like the image above. Now, the idea is to try presenting a data structure in a space or what is equivalent provide a bi-directional transformation (mapping) onto that space. Impossible? I don’t think so. Conclusion, do it then! Ok, watch this blog and your curiosity will be satisfied...

John von Neuman

John von Neumann (December 28, 1903 – February 8, 1957) was a Hungarian-born American pure and applied mathematician and polymath. He made major contributions to a number of fields,[1] including mathematics (foundations of mathematics, functional analysis, ergodic theory, geometry, topology, and numerical analysis), physics (quantum mechanics, hydrodynamics, and fluid dynamics), economics (game theory), computer science (Von Neumann architecture, linear programming, self-replicating machines, stochastic computing), and statistics.[2] He was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics, in the development of functional analysis, a principal member of the Manhattan Project and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (as one of the few originally appointed), and a key figure in the development of game theory[1][3] and the concepts of cellular automata,[1] the universal constructor, and the digital computer. Von Neumann’s mathematical analysis of the structure of self-replication preceded the discovery of the structure of DNA.[4] In a short list of facts about his life he submitted to the National Academy of Sciences, he stated “The part of my work I consider most essential is that on quantum mechanics, which developed in Göttingen in 1926, and subsequently in Berlin in 1927–1929. Also, my work on various forms of operator theory, Berlin 1930 and Princeton 1935–1939; on the ergodic theorem, Princeton, 1931–1932.” Along with Teller and Stanislaw Ulam, von Neumann worked out key steps in the nuclear physics involved in thermonuclear reactions and the hydrogen bomb. Von Neumann wrote 150 published papers in his life; 60 in pure mathematics, 20 in physics, and 60 in applied mathematics. His last work, an unfinished manuscript written while in the hospital and...

Giacomo Puccini

Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini (22 December 1858 – 29 November 1924), generally known as Giacomo Puccini, was an Italian composer whose operas are among the most frequently performed in the standard repertoire.[n 1] Puccini has been called “the greatest composer of Italian opera after Verdi”.[1] While his early work was rooted in traditional late-19th-century romantic Italian opera, he successfully developed his work in the ‘realistic’ verismo style, of which he became one of the leading exponents. >> Go to Source...

Paul Klee

Paul Klee (18 December 1879 – 29 June 1940) was a painter born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, and is considered to be a German-Swiss.[a] His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. He was also a student of orientalism.[1] Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually got deep into color theory, writing about it extensively; his lectures Writings on Form and Design Theory (Schriften zur Form und Gestaltungslehre), published in English as the Paul Klee Notebooks, are held to be as important for modern art as Leonardo da Vinci’s A Treatise on Painting for the Renaissance.[2][3][4] He and his colleague, the Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the German Bauhaus school of art, design and architecture. His works reflect his dry humour and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and also his musicality. >> Go to Source...

Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized 17 December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs. Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 and began studying with Haydn, quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. He lived in Vienna until his death. In about 1800 his hearing began to deteriorate, and by the last decade of his life he was almost totally deaf. He gave up conducting and performing in public but continued to compose; many of his most admired works come from this period. >> Go to Source...

Vassily Vassilyevich Kandinsky

Vassily Vassilyevich Kandinsky (16 December 1866 – 13 December 1944) was an influential Russian painter and art theorist. He is credited with painting the first purely abstract works. Born in Moscow, Kandinsky spent his childhood in Odessa. He enrolled at the University of Moscow, studying law and economics. Successful in his profession—he was offered a professorship (chair of Roman Law) at the University of Dorpat—he began painting studies (life-drawing, sketching and anatomy) at the age of 30. In 1896 Kandinsky settled in Munich, studying first at Anton Ažbe’s private school and then at the Academy of Fine Arts. He returned to Moscow in 1914, after the outbreak of World War I. Kandinsky was unsympathetic to the official theories on art in Communist Moscow, and returned to Germany in 1921. There, he taught at the Bauhaus school of art and architecture from 1922 until the Nazis closed it in 1933. He then moved to France where he lived for the rest of his life, becoming a French citizen in 1939 and producing some of his most prominent art. He died at Neuilly-sur-Seine in 1944. >> Go to Source...

Why curiosity is the key to science and medicine

Kevin B. Jones Science is a learning process that involves experimentation, failure and revision — and the science of medicine is no exception. Cancer researcher Kevin B. Jones faces the deep unknowns about surgery and medical care with a simple answer: honesty. In a thoughtful talk about the nature of knowledge, Jones shows how science is at its best when scientists humbly admit what they do not yet understand. Watch it...

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