One Hel(vetica) of a Story – I love Typography

Book review from http://ilovetypography.com/ It is hard not to simply gush about Paul Shaw’s Helvetica and the New York City Subway System: The True (Maybe) Story. For a life-student and consumer of design history and culture publications, it ticks so many boxes that to ‘merely’ enjoy it is really quite easy. While there has been much said about Helvetica+ since its publication in 2011, readers might wonder why a review, so late in the day is worthwhile. Like all good design books, each time one returns to it new things seem to come to the fore. But more important than this, I believe there have been some important omissions in the discussions and reviews since the publication of the MIT Press edition.­ >> Go to Source...

The magic of Fibonacci numbers

Math is logical, functional and just … awesome. Mathemagician Arthur Benjamin explores hidden properties of that weird and wonderful set of numbers, the Fibonacci series. (And reminds you that mathematics can be inspiring, too!) Using daring displays of algorithmic trickery, lightning calculator and number wizard Arthur Benjamin mesmerizes audiences with mathematical mystery and beauty. >> Play...

Loading half a billion rows into MySQL

Interesting post on the derwiki blog … Especially the commenting is quite entertaining! Amazing how ignorance produces patronizing statements (-> Morg). See belwo the top of teh post … Background We have a legacy system in our production environment that keeps track of when a user takes an action on Causes.com (joins a Cause, recruits a friend, etc). I say legacy, but I really mean a prematurely-optimized system that I’d like to make less smart. This 500m record database is split across monthly sharded tables. Seems like a great solution to scaling (and it is) — except that we don’t need it. And based on our usage pattern (e.g. to count a user’s total number of actions, we need to do query N tables), this leads to pretty severe performance degradation issues. Even with memcache layer sitting in front of old month tables, new features keep discovering new N-query performance problems. Noticing that we have another database happily chugging along with 900 million records, I decided to migrate the existing system into a single table setup. The goals were: reduce complexity. Querying one table is simpler than N tables. push as much complexity as possible to the database. The wrappers around the month-sharding logic in Rails are slow and buggy. increase performance. Also related to one table query being simpler than N. … >> Go to Source...

Hermann Klaus Hugo Weyl

Hermann Klaus Hugo Weyl, (9 November 1885 – 8 December 1955) was a German mathematician, theoretical physicist and philosopher. Although much of his working life was spent in Zürich, Switzerland and then Princeton, he is associated with the University of Göttingen tradition of mathematics, represented by David Hilbert and Hermann Minkowski. His research has had major significance for theoretical physics as well as purely mathematical disciplines including number theory. He was one of the most influential mathematicians of the twentieth century, and an important member of the Institute for Advanced Study during its early years.[4][5][6] Weyl published technical and some general works on space, time, matter, philosophy, logic, symmetry and the history of mathematics. He was one of the first to conceive of combining general relativity with the laws of electromagnetism. While no mathematician of his generation aspired to the ‘universalism’ of Henri Poincaré or Hilbert, Weyl came as close as anyone. Michael Atiyah, in particular, has commented that whenever he examined a mathematical topic, he found that Weyl had preceded him (The Mathematical Intelligencer (1984), vol.6 no.1). >> Go to Source...

Hilbert’s program

Never forget that even the most solid buildings of thought are supported by sand only … In mathematics, Hilbert’s program, formulated by German mathematician David Hilbert, was a proposed solution to the foundational crisis of mathematics, when early attempts to clarify the foundations of mathematics were found to suffer from paradoxes and inconsistencies. As a solution, Hilbert proposed to ground all existing theories to a finite, complete set of axioms, and provide a proof that these axioms were consistent. Hilbert proposed that the consistency of more complicated systems, such as real analysis, could be proven in terms of simpler systems. Ultimately, the consistency of all of mathematics could be reduced to basic arithmetic. However, some argue that Gödel’s incompleteness theorems showed in 1931 that Hilbert’s program was unattainable. In his first theorem, Gödel showed that any consistent system with a computable set of axioms which is capable of expressing arithmetic can never be complete: it is possible to construct a statement that can be shown to be true, but that cannot be derived from the formal rules of the system. In his second theorem, he showed that such a system could not prove its own consistency, so it certainly cannot be used to prove the consistency of anything stronger with certainty. This refuted Hilbert’s assumption that a finitistic system could be used to prove the consistency of itself, and therefore anything else. >> Go to Source...

Louis Malle

Louis Malle (30 October 1932 – 23 November 1995) was an award-winning French film director, screenwriter, and producer. His film, Le Monde du silence, won the Palme d’Or and Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1956. He was also nominated multiple times for Academy Awards later in his career. Malle worked in both French cinema and Hollywood, and he produced both French and English language films. His most famous films include Ascenseur pour l’échafaud (1958),Lacombe Lucien (1974), Atlantic City (1981), My Dinner with Andre (1981), and Au revoir, les enfants (1987). >> Go to Source...

Agile software development methodologies and how to apply them

Nice introduction to the matter and round up of the buzz words coming with it … This article is about basic introduction to Agile software development methodologies and how to apply them. It is about how to work together to achieve a common goal. This is not only suitable for the Software Developers but also for Team Leaders, Project Managers, Product Managers, Development Managers, Testers, QA Managers, QA Engineers, Technical Writers, UX Designers, anyone involves in the delivering of software. This article focus on how technology team work together well to plan, build and deliver software. It does not talk about code or not focus on specific technology or not only about Microsoft tools. Hope this will improve your professional life and the effectiveness of your team. The need for professional behave. Does our industry knows what it means to behave? The definition of a software developer, who sits in a room spend some time and code comes out. We get very confuse about deadlines, date, estimates and all of the things we are suppose to be doing, we do them badly. Now thats not unusual. Our industry is still young. >> Go to Source...

William Henry “Bill” Gates III

William Henry “Bill” Gates III (October 28, 1955 – …) is an American business magnate, investor, programmer,[3] inventor[4] and philanthropist. Gates is the former chief executive and current chairman of Microsoft, the world’s largest personal-computer software company, which he co-founded with Paul Allen. He is consistently ranked in the Forbes list of the world’s wealthiest people[5] and was the wealthiest overall from 1995 to 2009—excluding 2008, when he was ranked third;[6] in 2011 he was the wealthiest American and the world’s second wealthiest person.[7][8] According to the Bloomberg Billionaires List, Gates is the world’s richest person in 2013, a position that he last held on the list in 2007.[1] During his career at Microsoft, Gates held the positions of CEO and chief software architect, and remains the largest individual shareholder, with 6.4 percent of the common stock.[a] He has also authored and co-authored several books. Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. Gates has been criticized for his business tactics, which have been considered anti-competitive, an opinion which has in some cases been upheld by the courts.[11][12] In the later stages of his career, Gates has pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors, donating large amounts of money to various charitable organizations and scientific research programs through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, established in 2000.[13] Gates stepped down as chief executive officer of Microsoft in January 2000. He remained as chairman and created the position of chief software architect for himself. In June 2006, Gates announced that he would be transitioning from full-time work at Microsoft to part-time work, and full-time work at the...

John Marwood Cleese

John Marwood Cleese (27 October 1939 – …) is an English actor, comedian, writer and film producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and as a scriptwriter and performer on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s, he became a member of Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python’s Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely Different, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life. In the mid-1970s, Cleese and his first wife, Connie Booth, co-wrote and starred in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers. Later, he co-starred with Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis and former Python colleague Michael Palin in A Fish Called Wanda and Fierce Creatures. He also starred in Clockwise, and has appeared in many other films, including two James Bond films, two Harry Potter films, and the last three Shrek films. With Yes Minister writer Antony Jay he co-founded Video Arts, a production company making entertaining training films. >> Go to Source...

NGP Architecture Website going strong

Sofadeve proudly powers NGP Architecture Ltd for over 4 years now. A site presenting the impressive design solutions created by the powerful team at NGP. The aim is to share previously managed projects but also to let interested parties see the progress of current developments. Furthermore the site will develop into customer / client portal to share project documents and drawings online in a secure environment. But why don’t you check it out...

The tradeoffs of building green

In a short, funny, data-packed talk at TED U, Catherine Mohr walks through all the geeky decisions she made when building a green new house — looking at real energy numbers, not hype. What choices matter most? Not the ones you think. >> Play...

Big data is better data

And here is another TED talk. This time we are listening to wonderful Mr. Kenneth Cukier ……. Self-driving cars were just the start. What’s the future of big data-driven technology and design? In a thrilling science talk, Kenneth Cukier looks at what’s next for machine learning — and human knowledge. Watch...

Candy Dulfer

Lets hope that her birthday is good news for Great Britain ,,, and we are still together and look forward into a future of togetherness and peace …

How to get to 6 ? Solutions …

Here is one set of solving equations: (0! + 0! + 0!)! = 6 (1 + 1 + 1)! = 6 2 + 2 + 2 = 6 √(3 * 3) + 3 = 6 √4 + √4 + √4 = 6 (5 / 5) + 5 = 6 6 – 6 + 6 = 6 7 – (7 / 7) = 6 8 – √(√(8 + 8)) = 6 √(√(9 * 9)) + √9 = 6 I must admit thta I had to look up the factorial definition again … but it is true 0! = 1 . What is zero factorial? Also see the youTube clip where I got it from. Quite...

Patterns in the Fibonacci Numbers

Here are some patterns people have already noticed in the final digits of the Fibonacci numbers: Look at the final digit in each Fibonacci number – the units digit: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, … Is there a pattern in the final digits? 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 3, 1, 4, 5, 9, 4, 3, 7, 0, 7, … Yes! It takes a while before it is noticeable. In fact, the series is just 60 numbers long and then it repeats the same sequence again and again all the way through the Fibonacci series – for ever. We say the series of final digits repeats with a cycle length of 60. Suppose we look at the final two digits in the Fibonacci numbers. Do they have a pattern? 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, … Yes, there is a pattern here too. After Fib(300) the last two digits repeat the same sequence again and again. The cycle length is 300 this time. So what about the last three digits? and the last four digits? and so on?? For the last three digits, the cycle length is 1,500 for the last four digits,the cycle length is 15,000 and for the last five digits the cycle length is 150,000 and so on… >> Go to Source...

Why 12 notes to the Octave?

Here is the beginning of an exhausting explanation … The Greeks realized that sounds which have frequencies in rational proportion are perceived as harmonius. For example, a doubling of frequency gives an octave. A tripling of frequency gives a perfect fifth one octave higher. They didn’t know this in terms of frequencies, but in terms of lengths of vibrating strings. Pythagoras, who experimented with a monochord, noticed that subdividing a vibrating string into rational proportions produces consonant sounds. This translates into frequencies when you know that the fundamental frequency of the string is inversely proportional to its length, and that its other frequencies are just whole number multiples of the fundamental. (actually, the notion of consonance is more complicated than rationality- see, for example, this fascinating article ). First, we should examine what ratios are “meant” to exist in the western scale. The prominence of the major triad in western music reflects the Greek discoveries mentioned above. Starting with the note C as a fundamental, we get the major triad from the 3rd and 5th overtones, dropping down one and two octaves respectively, obtaining ratios of 3/2 (G:C) and 5/4 (E:C) respectively. Two other prominent features in western music include the V I cadence, and the I,IV,V triads. Both reflect the importance of the 3/2 ratio, with the IV further taking into account the reciprocal of 3/2, namely 2/3 aka 4/3. Musically, the reciprocal ratio corresponds to going down rather than up. While 3/2 corresponds to going up a fifth, 2/3 corresponds to going down a fifth, and 4/3 corresponds to going down a fifth and up an octave....

How to get to 6 ?

Just came across this little youTube clip . Basically you should use only mathematical operators / functions to fulfill all equations below: 0 0 0 = 6 1 1 1 = 6 2 2 2 = 6 3 3 3 = 6 4 4 4 = 6 5 5 5 = 6 6 6 6 = 6 7 7 7 = 6 8 8 8 = 6 9 9 9 = 6 There are multiple ways to do this. Here is an example for an easy one … the 4: ( 4 – √4 ) + 4 = 6 So, please give it your best shots and if you want to focus on the toughies … just do 0, 1 and 8. Full solution will be shown on this blog on the 19th September...

Voronoi Tessellation

In mathematics, a Voronoi diagram is a way of dividing space into a number of regions. A set of points (called seeds, sites, or generators) is specified beforehand and for each seed there will be a corresponding region consisting of all points closer to that seed than to any other. The regions are called Voronoi cells. It is dual to the Delaunay triangulation. It is named after Georgy Voronoy, and is also called a Voronoi tessellation, a Voronoi decomposition, a Voronoi partition, or a Dirichlet tessellation (after Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet). Voronoi diagrams can be found in a large number of fields in science and technology, even in art, and they have found numerous practical and theoretical applications. >> Goto Source Follow the link below to see an animated Voronoi Tessellation … be the wandering point … Voronoi Tessellation The Voronoi tessellation shows the closest point on the plane for a given set of points. This example updates the Voronoi diagram in response to mouse interaction! Colors by Cynthia Brewer; algorithm by Steven Fortune; implementation based on work by Nicolas Garcia Belmonte; interaction inspired by Raymond Hill. Also have a look on the base javascript library …...

John Venn and the Diagrams

Venn diagrams were introduced in 1880 by John Venn (1834–1923) in a paper entitled On the Diagrammatic and Mechanical Representation of Propositions and Reasonings in the “Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science”, about the different ways to represent propositions by diagrams.[1] The use of these types of diagrams in formal logic, according to Ruskey and M. Weston, is “not an easy history to trace, but it is certain that the diagrams that are popularly associated with Venn, in fact, originated much earlier. They are rightly associated with Venn, however, because he comprehensively surveyed and formalized their usage, and was the first to generalize them”.[2] Venn himself did not use the term “Venn diagram” and referred to his invention as “Eulerian Circles.”[1] For example, in the opening sentence of his 1880 article Venn writes, “Schemes of diagrammatic representation have been so familiarly introduced into logical treatises during the last century or so, that many readers, even those who have made no professional study of logic, may be supposed to be acquainted with the general nature and object of such devices. Of these schemes one only, viz. that commonly called ‘Eulerian circles,’ has met with any general acceptance…”[3] The first to use the term “Venn diagram” was Clarence Irving Lewis in 1918, in his book “A Survey of Symbolic Logic”.[2] Venn diagrams are very similar to Euler diagrams, which were invented by Leonhard Euler (1708–1783) in the 18th century.[note 1] M. E. Baron has noted that Leibniz (1646–1716) in the 17th century produced similar diagrams before Euler, but much of it was unpublished. She also observes even earlier Euler-like diagrams by...

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