Is religion good or bad?

Is religion good or bad?

You get the best when you watch it to the very end ! Plenty of good things are done in the name of religion, and plenty of bad things too. But what is religion, exactly — is it good or bad, in and of itself? Philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah offers a generous, surprising view. Kwame Anthony Appiah is a philosopher, cultural theorist and novelist. His latest book is “The Honor Code,” exploring moral revolutions. >> Watch...
Why truly innovative science demands a leap into the unknown

Why truly innovative science demands a leap into the unknown

While studying for his Ph.D in physics, Uri Alon thought he was a failure because all his research paths led to dead ends. But, with the help of improv theater, he came to realize that there could be joy in getting lost. A call for scientists to stop thinking of research as a direct line from question to answer, but as something more creative. It’s a message that will resonate, no matter what your field. Uri Alon studies how cells work, using an array of tools (including improv theater) to understand the biological circuits that perform the functions of life. >> Watch...

Design Patterns

Nice and neat overview including some criticism … isn’t that refreshing? In software engineering, a design pattern is a general repeatable solution to a commonly occurring problem in software design. A design pattern isn’t a finished design that can be transformed directly into code. It is a description or template for how to solve a problem that can be used in many different situations… >> Go to Source...
To create for the ages, let’s combine art and engineering

To create for the ages, let’s combine art and engineering

When Bran Ferren was just 9, his parents took him to see the Pantheon in Rome — and it changed everything. In that moment, he began to understand how the tools of science and engineering become more powerful when combined with art, with design and beauty. Ever since, he’s been searching for a convincing modern-day equivalent to Rome’s masterpiece. Stay tuned to the end of the talk for his unexpected suggestion. Watch...

Zooming the Zone

We all know that the best way to get something done is to write down a list of what to do. Well, here for you need of course some idea of what it is you are doing and that usually implies a little of analysing or broadly spoken “cutting into pieces”. In doing so it is sometimes necessary to keep cutting the things again and again until they are small enough to be digested. Parallels to actual eating food? Yes, naturally we wouldn’t eat the whole salmon in one go – even if it smells delicious and we can’t wait to have it down our throats. We would separate it into smaller pieces and then start pleasing our taste buds … but what happens when our cutting results in pieces which have the same behavior or structure, lets say pattern as one of the previously found? Deadlock? Frustration? Maybe initially some excitement of recognizing something and some pleasure of presumptuous “Oh, I know that!”. but that will die away quickly when we realize that we actually didn’t understand anything. Point of depression is reached quickly. However, no need to be disappointed. Just change the zoom from in to out and look at it from the whole. Embrace the thing. Let it simmer in your brain and find its own way. Remember the fractals and Mandelbrot set pictures? How certain pattern popped up again and again and the recursiveness of the whole thing became more and more obvious to that extent that we actually do understand now what this is about. At least some of us. Almost not necessary as...
Why curiosity is the key to science and medicine

Why curiosity is the key to science and medicine

Kevin B. Jones Science is a learning process that involves experimentation, failure and revision — and the science of medicine is no exception. Cancer researcher Kevin B. Jones faces the deep unknowns about surgery and medical care with a simple answer: honesty. In a thoughtful talk about the nature of knowledge, Jones shows how science is at its best when scientists humbly admit what they do not yet understand. Watch it...